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G3ict Research Topics
Convention on the Rights of PWDs
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Publications & Reports

e-Accessibility in a Connected World



This G3ICT White Paper picks up and builds on the topics addressed at the 10th European e-Accessibility Forum, held on 30 May 2016 at the Cité des Sciences in Paris. e-Accessibility in a Connected World is a G3ict Business Case White Paper Series published in March 2017.

This White Paper explores such topics as:

  • The potential of the IoT to bridge the digital divide
  • How dialogue can be instigated between e-Accessibility stakeholders and industry to ensure that all IoT components are born accessible
  • Practical examples of how the IoT can and will improve the lives of disabled and elderly people
  • How e-Accessibility stakeholders can tackle security and privacy issues and install trust among disabled and elderly users
  • The need for standards to ensure that IoT solutions are accessible, robust and interoperable.

The Internet of Things: Understanding the Issues and Challenges of a More Connected World



The Internet of Things promises to offer a revolutionary, fully connected “smart” world as the relationships between objects, their environment, and people become more tightly intertwined. Yet the issues and challenges associated with IoT need to be considered and addressed in order for the potential benefits for individuals, society, and the economy to be realized.

This overview document is designed to help the Internet Society community navigate the dialogue surrounding the Internet of Things in light of the competing predictions about its promises and perils. Five key IoT issue areas are examined to explore some of the most pressing challenges and questions related to the technology. These include security; privacy; interoperability and standards; legal, regulatory, and rights; and emerging economies and development. Published by the Internet Society in October 2015.
 

 

Rise of the Real-Time Traveler: An exploration of trends and innovation in urban mobility



Rise of the Real-Time Traveler starts by exploring developments such as changing demographics, urbanization and the continuing integration of technology in our daily lives. The report shines a light on how these shifts impact travelers, from ride-sharing and trip planning to automotive design. Published under the 'Its America Series' by AT&T in September 2015.

Connected consumers, connected cars, and the platforms that power them mean individual travelers have new levels of transportation choice, greater insight into the real-time benefits and costs associated with these choices, and an enhanced engagement with their decision making that can provide new levers for improving individual outcomes and overall system performance. This paper looks behind the headlines to understand what is driving this new era in transportation and how it is unfolding.

Internet of Things: New Promises for Persons with Disabilities



Recent developments in both networks and devices are enabling a much greater range of connected devices and Internet of Things (IoT) functionalities. This paper explores the impact of the IoT on persons with disabilities. A G3ict Business Case White Paper Series researched in cooperation with AT&T | Published in July 2015. Accessible PDF provided by BarrierBreak.

The Internet of Things opens new opportunities for persons with disabilities and seniors, giving them an unprecedented control on their environment. Home automation already provides tools for more independent living, and new applications appear on the market for health care, transportation, education and employment. In the years to come, standardization, security and privacy will have to be addressed by industry, government and users.

» Order a hard copy

» Press Release

» Available in Russian (download PDF, 700 KB)
 

 

Socioeconomic Impacts of Wireless Technology



The purpose of this report is to assess socioeconomic opportunities and challenges that arise from existing and emerging uses of wireless (licensed spectrum) technology, with a particular focus on the areas of health, finance, education, and empowerment. The report was commissioned by CTIA—The Wireless Association® and prepared by BSR | May 2012

The effect of wireless technology on modern society has been profound. Wireless mobility enables instant communication anywhere, anytime, mobilizing the rapid transfer of information and services over immense distances, unbound by geographic barriers. New ways to connect, share, and innovate using wireless technology are invented every day around the world, and are shattering traditional walls that have divided societies for centuries. In this report, we examine the social effects through four lenses: Health Care, Finance, Education, and Community Empowerment.

Transforming Learning Through mEducation



Mobile technology is raising the quality of education and improving access to it. Early initiatives in mobile education, or “mEducation” are already enhancing learning outcomes worldwide. With growing availability and demand, mEducation is poised to become a USD 70 billion market by 2020 | GSMA and McKinsey & Company | 2012

We define mEducation as technology-enabled learning solutions available to learners anytime, anywhere. Any portable device, such as a tablet, laptop or mobile phone, that provides access to educational content through mobile connectivity (2G, 3G, or 4G complemented by mobile-based Wi-Fi) can be a tool for mEducation. Mobile technology’s power to transform education is difficult to overstate, given the importance and impact of learning that takes place outside a traditional classroom environment.

Technological Innovations in Transportation for People with Disabilities



The report summarizes a workshop held on February 23, 2011 to examine technological innovations in accessible transportation and better understand the requirements of pedestrians and travelers with visual impairment or other disabilities | U.S. Department of Transportation | February 2011

To examine technological innovations in accessible transportation and better understand the requirements of pedestrians and travelers with visual impairment or other disabilities, the Federal Highway Administration’s Office of Research, Development, and Technology and, specifically, leaders from the Office of Operations Research and Development and the Exploratory Advanced Research Program, convened a 1-day workshop to explore this area. In February 2011, a panel of speakers made up of disability experts, academia professionals, transportation industry experts, and other professionals were brought together to discuss applications of technology, identify knowledge gaps and opportunities, and highlight barriers to implementation.

Through the distribution of this summary report to the workshop participants and the broader highway and disability communities, we aim to encourage further discussion regarding the development of technological applications for pedestrians and travelers with disabilities. These discussions could also lead to the identification of future research needs and opportunities to enhance the transportation accessibility for all Americans.

M-Enabling Summit 2011 Official Show Guide



Official Show Guide for the Inaugural Edition of the M-Enabling Summit 2011 Global Conference and Showcase for Mobile Applications and Services for Seniors and Persons with Disabilities | 5-6 December 2011, The Gaylord National Resort and Convention Center at National Harbor, Washington, D.C.

The M-Enabling Summit (5-6 December 2011), Global Summit and Showcase for Mobile Applications and Services for Seniors and Persons with Disabilities, is the first global program solely dedicated to participants in the emerging ecosystem for mobile accessible and assistive technologies, applications and services.

Visit event website at: http://www.m-enabling.com/

Making Mobile Phones and Services Accessible for Persons with Disabilities



Making Mobile Phones and Services Accessible for Persons with Disabilities is a joint report of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) and G3ict. Researched and Edited by the Center for Internet & Society | Published by ITU - August 2012

Mobile communications have become in less than two decades omnipresent in all countries, reaching out to the most isolated and underserved populations in developed and developing countries alike. At the end of 2011, there were more than 5.9 billion mobile-cellular telephone subscriptions. By the same point in 2013, we expect such subscriptions to outnumber the global population.

In the midst of this telecommunication revolution, however, populations of senior citizens and persons living with disabilities have been left out due to accessibility factors: complex human interfaces difficult to understand and activate for persons with cognitive impairments or learning disabilities, lack of alternative communications for persons living with low vision, blind, hard of hearing or deaf, or, quite often handset ergonomics too difficult for persons with physical disabilities such as dexterity or mobility limitations.

This report contains references to the new legislative and regulatory framework set by the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, an important resource for policy makers. It also covers practical elements required for a successful implementation of those programs and policies.

Available in the following formats:
» Download PDF - English version
» Download PDF - French version
» Download PDF - Arabic version
» Download PDF - Chinese version
» Download PDF - Spanish version
» Download PDF - Russian version

Read the Press Release associated with this publication.

The Effectiveness of M-Health Technologies for Improving Health and Health Services: A Systematic Review



This systematic review will summarize the evidence for the effectiveness of mobile technology interventions for improving health and health service outcomes (M-Health) around the world. Authors: Caroline Free, Gemma Phillips; Lambert Felix; Leandro Galli; Vikram Patel; Philip Edwards; BMC Research Notes

M-health, the use of mobile computing and communication technologies in health care and public health, is a rapidly expanding area of research and practice. M-health programmes and interventions use mobile electronic devices (MEDs), such as personal digital assistants and mobile phones, for a range of functions to support health behaviour change and chronic disease management by patients in the community.
 
This systematic review will provide recommendations on the use of mobile computing and communication technology in health care and public health and will guide future work on intervention development and primary research in this field.

The Clear Print Standard: Arguments for a Flexible Approach



This report makes recommendations for a more flexible and practicable version of the Clear Print guidelines published by the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB) for adoption within the public sector.

As well as Large Print for people with impaired vision, the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB) also publishes Clear Print guidelines for general use. These have been widely adopted in the public sector. In these notes we take a critical look at what they say about type size, and the evidence on which the standard is based. We support the idea of a minimum type size for normal text, but question the inflexibility which inhibits some organisations from using even slightly smaller sizes for diagrams and tables – features that can make information clearer. We make recommendations for a more flexible and practicable version.

99 Tips for the Use of Mobile Phones for Students with Disabilities



The 99 tools from the magical pocket of Aki-chan: this research project provides tips on how mobile phones can offer strategies to engage students in learning in ways that best suit their needs.

“The 99 tools from the magical pocket of Aki-chan”: reading, writing, keeping and making notes, understanding time, planning activities, listening, calculating and using a dictionary, surfing the web, calling and messaging friends can all be undertaken on a mobile phone using tools from the ‘magical pocket".

The Magical Pocket of Aki-chan Project has been co-researched by the Research Centre of Advanced Science and Technology at the University of Tokyo and SoftBank Mobile Corp. The project name represents the mobile phone as a ‘magical pocket’ filled with tools ‒ each time you go into the pocket you can pull out a strategy that may help support the learning and participation in the classroom, of a student with disabilities. The aim of the project is to conduct research as well as raise awareness of the use of the mobile phone to support the independence of these students in their daily lives.

Data-Enabled Travel: How Geo-Data Can Support Inclusive Transportation, Tourism, and Navigation through Communities



This report explains what we have learned about the potential of geo-data for accessible travel. It also offers suggestions to interested stake holders about next steps toward the realization of this potential.

This report is a result of discussions that took place in July 2010 commemorating the 20th anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act at the White House. Participants of the discussion were asked to focus on the challenge of more accessible travel, transportation, and tourism by applying geo-data.
 
User needs should form the basis of any initiative aimed at improving transportation information services for people with disabilities. In the field of assistive technologies, mobile devices, have emerged as a champion for accomodating user needs. Mobile technology has helped inform and empower citizens of all ages and abilities to accomplish safe and independent travel around our country.
 

Accessibility, Innovation and Sustainability at AT&T



A G3ict White Paper Documenting How Mobile Service Providers Can Serve Persons with Disabilities and Seniors

In order to promote the business practices required to provide accessible and assistive mobile equipment and services to persons with disabilities, G3ict requested that AT&T opens its doors to review and document its internal R&D and business processes for the benefit all interested parties. Read more.

 

Open Source Software-Based Assistive Technologies



Written by Fernando Botelho, founder of Project F123.org, this article defines open source software-based assistive technology.

Written by Fernando Botelho, founder of Project F123.org, this article defines open source software-based assistive technology.

Mobile Industry Good Practice Guide for Service Delivery for Disabled and Elderly Customers in the UK




This good practice guide for service delivery is designed to advise and assist the mobile industry, including network operators, service providers and retailers on how to make their products and services more accessible to the UK's disabled and elderly consumers.

Wireless Phones: Survey of Users Needs (Georgia Tech Wireless RERC)



This is the second in a series of annual reports based on data collected from the Survey of User Needs (SUN), an ongoing survey conducted by the Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center for Wireless Technologies (Wireless RERC).

The original Survey of User Needs (SUN1.0) was conducted from 2001-2006, with more than 1200 people responding to that survey. In 2007, the SUN was revised and data collection began with version 2.0 in April 2007.

By December 2007, over 1200 participants had completed SUN 2.0. A year later, another 348 respondents had completed the survey for a total of 1556. 1406 respondents reported one or more functional limitations such as difficulty in learning or remembering, difficulty in doing manual tasks, or difficulty in seeing or hearing. Download the report for survey findings.

NTT DOCOMO's Mobile Phones for Persons with Disabilities



In his presentation, Mr. Ryuji Nagata, Manager of Product Department, NTT DOCOMO Inc., Japan reviews: (1) Japanese cell phone market; (2) Universal design approach in NTT DOCOMO; (3) What is Raku-Raku phone?; (4) New features of Raku-Raku phone; (5) Bone condyction receiver "Sound Leaf."

In his presentation, Mr. Ryuji Nagata, Manager of Product Department, NTT DOCOMO Inc., Japan reviews: (1) Japanese cell phone market; (2) Universal design approach in NTT DOCOMO; (3) What is Raku-Raku phone?; (4) New features of Raku-Raku phone; (5) Bone condyction receiver "Sound Leaf."

G3ict "ICT Accessibility Self-Assessment Framework"



The G3ict Self-Assessment Framework is the first comprehensive tool made available to policy makers to evaluate their country’s compliance with the many dispositions of the Convention in matters of ICT accessibility. Developed by the G3ict Research Committee, it is designed to facilitate consensus building among governments and multiple stakeholders seeking to identify priorities at national level.

Presentation on the Convention's New Agenda for Digital Accessibility and Assistive Technologies



Compiled by G3ict, this presentation was given at CSUN 24th Annual International Conference on Technology and Persons with Disabilities, held in Los Angeles (March 16-21, 2009).

Compiled by G3ict, this presentation was given at CSUN 24th Annual International Conference on Technology and Persons with Disabilities, held in Los Angeles (March 16-21, 2009).

A Case Study of One of the Most Successful Programs Designed by a Higher Education Institution to Promote Employability among Students Living with Disability



Written by Professor Licia Sbattella, President's Delegate for Disabilities at Politecnico di Milano, Italy, this case study will be presented at the 4th Shafallah International Forum on Children with Special Needs: Achieving Independence, Doha, Qatar, April 20-22.

The Accessibility Imperative



"The Accessibility Imperative" is the first attempt made to present in one comprehensive volume the challenges and opportunities of implementing the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in matters of accessibility to Information and Communication Technologies. The Convention at large - and more specifically its Article 9 - creates the first universal framework specifically addressing these issues which affect over 600,000,000 persons living with disabilities worldwide.


Please note: The link takes you to the webpage of the Danish National Library. To access the DAISY version, click on "Afspil" (play) button. You will be redirected to a new window/tab with the online player. The redirect should happen within a few seconds, if this does not happen, try to press the "Afspil" (Play) button on the redirect page.
 
"The Accessibility Imperative" is the first attempt made to present in one comprehensive volume the challenges and opportunities of implementing the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in matters of accessibility to Information and Communication Technologies. The Convention at large - and more specifically its Article 9 - creates the first universal framework specifically addressing these issues which affect over 600,000,000 persons living with disabilities worldwide.

This book was developed based upon the proceedings of the first Global Forum of the G3ict, the Global Initiative for Inclusive ICTs, held at the United Nations headquarters in New York on March 26, 2007. It presents the perspective of multiple stakeholders from all regions of the world and from a variety of backgrounds: industry, policy makers, international institutions, academia, and non-governmental organizations representing persons living with disabilities. Additional editorial content was contributed to G3ict and included in this first edition from meetings held in Russia, Korea, and the United States during the Spring of 2007.

With 129 countries having signed the Convention as of May 2008, the scope of legislative and regulatory work which will take place over the next few years in matters of ICT accessibility is considerable. This first edition will be the first reference made available to policy makers and their many constituents to facilitate the process of identifying the best path towards effective implementation of the Convention.

Related Publication: G3ict publishes 2nd edition of the CRPD Progress Report on ICT Accessibility | Download PDF.

 

Presentation on Assistive Technologies: Leveraging ICTs for Persons with Disabilities, Challenges and Opportunities



Compiled by G3ict , this presentation was given at the ITU Regional Workshop on "ICT Accessibility for Persons with Disabilities," held in Lusaka, Zambia (July 15-16, 2008)

EU - Total Conversation and Emergency Call 112



EU press release and packet regarding the EU announcement of stepped up efforts to use a single emergency phone number to call for assistance – 112 and implementing a pilot service, “Total Conversation”, making the 112 number accessible to all across Europe.

Technology and Disability Policy Highlights, June 2008



Published monthly by the Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center for Wireless Technologies (Wireless RERC), this June 2008 issue focuses on The House Subcommittee on Economic Development, Public Buildings and Emergency Management hearing discussing the introduction of proposed legislation entitled \"Twenty-First Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act of 2008\" and the passing of the \"New and Emerging Technologies 911 Improvement Act of 2008\" that includes a directive to improve access to 911 and enhanced 911 services for people with disabilities.

Technology and Disability Policy Highlights, May 2008



Published monthly by the Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center for Wireless Technologies (Wireless RERC), this May 2008 issue focuses on The House Subcommittee on Telecommunications and the Internet hearing discussing the draft legislation "Enhancing Access to Broadband Technology and Services for Persons with Disabilities."

Technology and Disability Policy Highlights, April 2008



Published monthly by the Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center for Wireless Technologies (Wireless RERC), this April 2008 issue focuses on how reducing wireless accessibility barriers has been a recurring theme in recent legislation in the U.S. Congress.

Assessment of the Status of eAccessibility in Europe



This Executive Summary of Measuring Progress of eAccessibility in Europe (MeAC) is a report from a study commissioned by the European Commission in 2006 as a follow up to the eAccessibility Communication of 2005. The basic aim was the provide an evidence base to support the future deveopment of EU policy in the eAccessibility field.

Joint ANEC-EDF Position on eAccessibility



This joint ANEC/EDF position paper expresses views on the accessibility of Information Communication Technologies (ICT) products and services by consumers of all ages and abilities.

Web Accessibility at General Electric



Preety Kumar, Founder, President, and CEO of Deque Systems, Inc., discusses the significance of web accessibility and how General Electric recognized the necessity of accessible techniques in regards to making Web sites accessible to persons with disabilities.

Impact of Technology Trends on e-Inclusion Policy and Practice



The technologies used in information and communication products are advancing at an ever increasing rate. Devices are getting smaller, lighter, cheaper, and more capable. Electronics are being incorporated into practically everything, making a wide variety of products programmable, and thus more flexible. Computing power is increasing exponentially. What requires a supercomputer one year can be done on a child's game player 15 years later.

 

An Avatar Based Approach for Automatic Interpretation of Text to Sign Language



Written by Mohamed Jemni and Oussama Elghoul, this paper describes a current project at the University of Tunis to develop, for the deaf community, a tool facilitating communication through the Web. The aim of this tool is to interpret automatically texts in visual-gestural-spatial language by using Avatar technology.


Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center's (RERC) First Report on the Findings of the Survey of User Needs (SUN)



Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center's (RERC) first report on the findings of a new study aimed at surveying user needs vis-a-vis wireless technologies. The people surveyed represent a large portion of the 40 million Americans with disabilities.